What vaccinations/immunisations does my child need?

Before birth, a baby receives natural immunity to some diseases from its mother. But this immunity quickly begins to wear off after they are born. The NHS recommends the first lot of vaccines when a baby is around 8 weeks old and a few more before they turn 18.

Here is a table of all the vaccinations your child will need and at what age they are recommended to have them.

United Kingdom's NHS Vaccination Schedule

Age of vaccination

Disease immunised against

Name of vaccination

8 weeks

Diptheria, hepatitis B, Hib, polio, tetanus, whooping cough

Infanrix hexa (also known as the 6-in-1 vaccine)

Pneumococcal infections

Prevenar 13

Rotavirus

Rotarix

Meningococcal B

Bexsero

3 months

Diptheria, hepatitis B, Hib, polio, tetanus, whooping cough (2nd dose)

Infanrix hexa (also known as the 6-in-1 vaccine)

Rotavirus (2nd dose)

Rotarix

4 months

Diptheria, hepatitis B, Hib, polio, tetanus, whooping cough (3rd dose)

Infanrix hexa (also known as the 6-in-1 vaccine)

Pneumococcal infections (2nd dose)

Prevenar 13

Meningococcal B (2nd dose)

Bexsero

1 year

Measles, mumps, rubella

Priorix, or M-M-RVAXPRO

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C

Menitorix

Pneumococcal infections (3rd dose)

Prevenar 13

Meningococcal B (3rd dose)

Bexsero

3 years and 4 months

Diptheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio

Infanrix IPV, or PEPEVAX (also known as the 4-in-1 pre-school booster)

Measles, mumps, and rubella (2nd dose)

Priorix, or M-M-RVAXPRO (also known as the MMR vaccine)

12-13 years

Human papilloma virus (HPV)

Gardasil

14 years

Tetanus, diptheria, polio

Revaxis (also known as the 3-in-1 teenage booster)

Meningitis, septicaemia (blood poisoning)

Nimenrix

Valid on 11 October 2018

Why does my child need the same vaccine more than once?

The vaccination schedule is designed to try and protect your child for life. To do this, some vaccines are given multiple times over a few years. This is because some vaccines offer high levels of protection after just one dose (such as the MMR vaccine) whilst others are not as effective (the typhoid vaccine, for example) and need to be a repeated a few times so that the benefits don’t wear off.

Can a baby really handle all of those vaccinations?

You might feel that giving too many vaccines at once will be too much for your baby to handle. But research has shown that there are no harmful effects from giving multiple vaccines at one time. Babies come into contact with huge numbers of different bacteria and viruses from the moment they are born and as their immune systems learn to fight them off, they become stronger. Vaccines simply add a few more (killed or weakened) germs to a baby’s immune system (less than they would usually be exposed to in everyday life!) so they can learn to fight them off too.

Will my baby have side-effects after the vaccination?

After your child is vaccinated, their immune system is hard at work learning how to fight off the disease they’ve been immunised against. Some children may have some mild
side-effects as a result. A common side-effect is pain at the injection site and fever, which can be treated with paracetamol or ibuprofen* (children older than 3 months).

If you are at all worried about your baby’s vaccinations, or have any questions, do not hesitate to contact your doctor.